Sunday, May 6, 2007

Brazil and the oil shortage.


From:
Lothiack.
Sent
: Sunday, May 06, 2007 10:51 AM
To: wwo@worldwithoutoil.org
Subject: Brazil and the oil shortage.


Biofuels - Worlds Green Heart Death

We have seen this in the years before the oil shortage, and now it´s escalated in an unbelievable way. The world´s thirst for fuel and Brazil´s bad administration over the Amazon area has led to an unprecedented deforestation crisis that affects the global climate patterns and the social relations of Brazil´s population.

When our supplies of Oil were plentiful and our machines ran using them, this was already happening: the destruction of the forest and creation of massive Soy fields over the Amazon border. Up to 25.000Km were destroyed in 2004. Now that we are going towards the massive use of Biofuels, fuel made from soy and other oily plants, as the main way to power our vehicles and machines the area of destruction has increased in a way that's going to kill most of the forest in less than 10 years. Amazon being one of the Americas and world´s biggest producers of water vapor and rainfall, this kind of degradation will probably lead to a global farming crisis. Is that price worth it?

After years of attrition Civil War finally begun. Family farmers called arms to fight against the Multinational Soy Producers; they responded by hiring mercenaries and private security to protect their lands. Acting as guerrillas the families hide in the remaining forests and assault the farms whenever possible, in a movement that's gaining power all over the country, making a polarization of opinions and adepts who riot on every major city in Brazil.

Who knows what this could lead to?

Wish us luck,

Lothiack

Watch: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1967359008647386179&q=amazon+destruction+soy

2 comments:

Rainey said...

Wow, Lothiak. This reminds me of the bullfrog problem in Australia, trying to solve one problem causing another.

Makes you wonder:Ethanol as a global solution to petroleum means the fuel crops would be grown *where*...?

I've been digging into our high yield community garden, focusing on high yields, combining crops, permaculture etc-- the contrast to monoculture acreage ruining key rainforest is, oof. I mean. Grim.
Rainey

Lothiack said...

Well, biofuels are the way to go, but they should come along with other kinds of fuels and some strict regulation as to where and how they should be cultivated and who should do the farming.

My father comes from Pará(one of the most devastaded regions) and I´ve been there, into the Amazon river and everything, but I doubt my children will be able to see the beauty of the place.

:-(